Shervin Pishevar: AI, Uber, Money 2.0, and Blockchain Technology

Uber is now looking to the skies with air taxis. Blockchain technology leads the discussion of Money 2.0. The cryptocurrency market already exceeded 1% of the world’s GDP. Artificial intelligence is deemed as the most likely lucrative investment for the coming decade. Developers from around the world seek to distribute computing power through the cloud. All of this points to a global connectivity and awakening unlike anything seen since the Internet gave each of us a global email address.

We did not need to pay for our first email address. Innovation was so profound that it fundamentally reshaped communication. Shervin Pishevar is the type of individual that can see these things coming. He foretold the fall and current recovery of the Bitcoin price. Shervin Pishevar saw the potential in Uber and invested early. Artificial intelligence is not surprising anyone, but it does take someone like Shervin Pishevar to understand where the greatest profits can be derived.

It is no coincidence that these technologies are advancing at the same time. AI is increasingly becoming a standard for automobiles. Driverless Uber taxis will depend upon AI. But, what does it depend on? Few are aware that blockchain technology is of benefit to AI.

Blockchains are databases. AIs need information. Shervin Pishevar realizes that blockchains do more than secure digital transactions. Not only can they securely confirm and store information, but their adaptability makes applications seem limitless. True blockchains are immutable. An AI would not be very useful if information could be changed on a whim. Blockchains can turn conventional transactions into digitized assets.

Making cryptographic security a fundamental aspect of a platform exclusively designed for digital transactions excites theorists of Money 2.0. After all, the barrier preventing most consumers from committing to digital payments is security.

True blockchains are the answer for the skeptical consumer. One reason why they seem slow to adopt is that of scalability issues. Many developers do not believe scaling to be the most challenging problem. Perception, and the magnitude of changing to Money 2.0, often present immense challenges. Blockchains provide proof and history of their transactions.

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